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Hearings

The Indeterminate Sentence Review Board (ISRB or Board) is a quasi-judicial board that makes informed release decisions relating to a convicted person’s release or further incarceration by a thorough analysis of the persons past and present behavior and risk to public safety.

The Board exercises these powers and duties by conducting hearings according to rules and regulations codified in WAC 381 . Read more below for information about hearings the Board conducts and the upcoming schedule of hearings:

Prison Release Hearings

Prison Hearings ScheduleMicrosoft Excel document file

Includes previous prison hearing outcomes and future hearing dates and locations.

Prison hearings are the means by which the Board decides if an inmate (as defined here) should be released from prison.

The Board makes decisions based on a variety of factors, including criminal history, actuarial risk assessment(s), the victim’s statement, completion of offender change programs, release plans and other factors.

Types of Prison Hearings

The Board holds three different types of prison hearings.

Parolability Hearings

These hearings are also known as ".100" or "Pre-84" hearings and are for Parole (PRE) inmates who committed their crime(s) prior to July 1, 1984 (RCW 9.95.100 ).

The Board uses the hearing process to help them decide if the inmate's rehabilitation has been complete and the person is a fit subject for release. The Board cannot grant the release of a PRE inmate until they have made such a decision. During the hearing, a lawyer will be present to assist and advocate for the inmate. The lawyer may ask the Classification Counselor questions.

If the Board decides the inmate is not releasable, additional time may be added to that person's minimum term. Time can be added at a hearing to the minimum term until the statutory maximum is reached.

Community Custody Board Release Hearings

These hearings are also known as ".420" hearings and are for Community Custody Board (CCB) inmates who committed certain sex crimes after on or after September 1, 2001 (RCW 9.95.420(3) ).

The Board uses this hearing process to decide whether it is more likely than not the offender will engage in sex offenses if released on conditions. The Community Custody Release prison hearings differ from "Parolability" prison hearings in some important ways:

  • The Board Members always review an End of Sentence Review Committee report before the hearing.
  • The Department has determined not to provide lawyers at Community Custody Release hearings, and to avoid economic discrimination, private attorneys are not allowed. However, sometimes the Board requests the contract attorney to represent an offender who cannot represent them self.

If the Board decides that a CCB offender is not releasable, they can add up to 60 months to the minimum term. Time can be added at a hearing to the minimum term until the statutory maximum is reached.

Juvenile Board Case Hearings

These hearings are also known as "JUVBRD" hearings and are for Juvenile Board inmates who committed crimes prior to their 18th birthday and are sentenced as adults (RCW 9.95.730 ).

The Board uses this hearing to determine if the inmate is more likely than not to commit new criminal law violations.

If the Board finds a Long Term Juvenile Board (LT JUVBRD) not releasable, they can set a time for them to re-petition up to 60 months.

If the Board finds an Aggravated Murder Juvenile (AM JUVBRD) not releasable, they can add up to 60 months to their minimum term.

Decisions
  • Decisions are published no later than 30 days from the date of the hearing for Parolability cases and Long Term Juvenile Boardcases.
  • Decisions are published within six to eight weeks from the date of the hearing for Community Custody Board cases and Aggravated Murder Juvenile Board cases.

Supervision Violation Hearings

Violation Hearings ScheduleAdobe PDF document file

Includes previous violation hearing outcomes and future hearing dates and locations.

Conditions of supervision are very important. These are the rules that must be followed by people on parole (PRE inmates), community custody (CCB offenders) or juvenile board inmates (JUVBRD inmates). They may be put in place by the sentencing court or the Board.

Supervision in the community helps guide those under Department of Corrections (DOC) supervision toward success. Conditions also set direction for DOC supervision of inmates. "Violations" of the conditions of supervision call for timely and fitting responses. When a person under DOC supervision violates a condition of supervision, the DOC must notify the Board within one working day.

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